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The Arizona Beehive http://arizonabeehive.com Local. LDS. Love Fri, 10 Nov 2017 12:41:56 -0800 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9 82948267 AN ENDEAVOR OF LOVE – Endeavor Senior In-Home Care http://arizonabeehive.com/an-endeavor-of-love-endeavor-senior-in-home-care/ http://arizonabeehive.com/an-endeavor-of-love-endeavor-senior-in-home-care/#comments_reply Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:15:47 +0000 http://arizonabeehive.com/?p=6641 When asked what makes Endeavor Senior In-Home Care different from other caregiving companies, Dave Rogers, the CEO and founder of the company, points to a picture of Christ comforting Mary and Martha at their brother Lazarus’ death, and states, “Service is its own reward. We strive to follow his example.”

Dave and his wife Nancy founded the company in 2015 after having the experience of having given care themselves to close family members.

“Until you understand that ache in your heart,” Dave said in regards to experiencing loss, “it’s hard to be that effective caregiver.”

Endeavor Senior In-Home Care Val Vista Location Reception.

Endeavor Senior In-Home Care Val Vista Location Reception.

Endeavor Senior In-Home Care provides multiple services, including Alzheimer’s/Dementia, Parkinson’s, Senior Companion Care, Post-Surgery, Physical Disability Support, and VA aid for veterans. They also take the time to help potential clients better understand how to assist loved ones who may need in-home care services and when the time is right to incorporate those services. Visitors may even leave with a batch of homemade cookies given in appreciation of their interest in learning more.

The company, however, is glad to go that extra mile in providing educational opportunities to people on the subject of dementia and Alzheimer’s, a disease that ranks number fourth among leading causes of death in the state of Arizona. This education is promoted by the company’s partnership with Dementia Care Education, headed by Dr. Brian Browne, who also works as Director of Education and Outreach at Banner Research.

In speaking with Dave and other employees, it’s clear they have a sincere care for those who need both assistance and companionship on a physical and social level. Employees are compassionate, whether in aiding with patients’ acute health issues or just joining them in a game of cards, and all caregivers are highly trained. Endeavor caregivers are Certified Home Health Aids or CNAs (Certified Nurse Assistant), many having previous experience. Most have a personal understanding of the needs and worries of those they provide care for. For those who are not certified but still interested, training is gladly provided by the company.

Dave and Nancy have a desire to find more ways to assist and serve other people. One way is to expand their business across the state with the goal of moving from two locations to seven.

It’s clear that the team behind Endeavor see it as more of a service to others then simply a business opportunity. For them, it’s another way of expressing their Christ-like love.

Story by Parker Sappington, The Arizona Beehive

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THIS YEAR, THE HOLY LAND! Equity Life Institute Offers Holy Land Experiences http://arizonabeehive.com/this-year-the-holy-land-equity-life-institute-offers-holy-land-experiences/ http://arizonabeehive.com/this-year-the-holy-land-equity-life-institute-offers-holy-land-experiences/#comments_reply Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:15:46 +0000 http://arizonabeehive.com/?p=6628 A peaceful sunset at the Sea of Galilee. Photo courtesy of EquityLife Institute in Galilee.

A peaceful sunset at the Sea of Galilee. Photo courtesy of EquityLife Institute in Galilee.

Think the closest you’ll get to the Holy Land is the map in your scriptures? Think again! Equity Life Institute in Galilee offers explorations of the Middle East that will deepen travelers’ appreciation for the rich and sacred traditions of the places Christ Himself walked.

Dann Hone, EquityLife Institute in Galilee founder and managing director, brings a wealth of knowledge to each journey. He is an adjunct faculty member with Utah Valley University in the Department of History and Political Science as well as a BYU emeritus faculty member. Hone helped found the Jerusalem Center of Near Eastern Studies and has headed many trips in the Middle East and throughout the world.

Unlike traditional commercial tours, EquityLife offers curricula and cultural encounters that personalize the Middle East for travelers. Tours are supplemented with lectures and experiences that bring visitors face to face not only with historical sites, but with local people and culture.

Participants can experience the testimony of Elder Bruce R. McConkie at Christ’s Garden Tomb, sunrise hikes at Mt. Sinai, swims in the Dead Sea, and quiet moments at the Sea of Galilee and the Judean countryside.

Spring at Christ’s Garden Tomb. Photo courtesy of EquityLife Institute in Galilee.

Spring at Christ’s Garden Tomb. Photo courtesy of EquityLife Institute in Galilee.

Church members who tour the Middle East “find a temporal and divine witness of the great spiritual and historical realities recorded in scripture,” Hone says.

“For many,” he continues, “the Holy Land is a land of peaceful meditation and a calming balm in the midst of a turbulent world.” This view can run contrary to the narrative that many hold about the Middle East, that it is a dangerous place of conflict.

“I feel safer in the streets of every major city or small town in the Holy Land, more than I do in most larger cities in the USA,” Hone says.

In addition to their 3-week Intensive Exploration programs, EquityLife offers summer term programs for high school graduates and college students, and has added a humanitarian program and the Transcultural Humanitarian and Holistic Nursing Internship program. Each will allow participants to experience Middle Eastern culture, but also to serve and learn.

“Plans for this coming year include helping rebuild a playground for special needs children from throughout the West Bank, working in a reconstructed historic village, and construction projects in a Bethlehem school,” Hone says of the humanitarian program.  “The nursing interns will be doing a variety of transcultural care while teaching principles of palliative and hospice care.”

King David’s cenotaph, one of the many sacred sites visited by ELI participants. Photo by Jason Hone.

King David’s cenotaph, one of the many sacred sites visited by ELI participants. Photo by Jason Hone.

While EquityLife prides itself on keeping costs reasonable, scholarships and grants are available to would-be participants in need. To that end, EquityLife seeks donations to help offset the expense of ELI programs in Galilee for middle- and low-income applicants.

Hone hopes more people will be able to take advantage of the ELI Galilee programs: “Every time we have the opportunity to return, our trips have opened up new insights.”

The 2018 Spring Intensive Explorations program faculty/director is Cal Andreasen, former ASU Institute of Religion teacher. Andreasen will be accompanied by his wife, Alice.

To learn more about ELI’s programs, visit http://www.equitylifeinstitute.org or call 844-866-8448, extension 5.  Email info@equity.life to receive ELI’s news and announcements.

Story by Merry Gordon, The Arizona Beehive

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SERVICE. EXCELLENCE. TRADITION – Rowley Chapman & Barney, LTD http://arizonabeehive.com/service-excellence-tradition-rowley-chapman-barney-ltd/ http://arizonabeehive.com/service-excellence-tradition-rowley-chapman-barney-ltd/#comments_reply Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:15:46 +0000 http://arizonabeehive.com/?p=6620 From left to right: Nicole Bernabe, Kenneth Barney, Kevin Chapman, Joshua Boyle, Nathaniel Wadsworth and Brian Strong. Photo courtesy of Rowley Chapman and Barney.

From left to right: Nicole Bernabe, Kenneth Barney, Kevin Chapman, Joshua Boyle, Nathaniel Wadsworth and Brian Strong. Photo courtesy of Rowley Chapman and Barney.

The law firm of Rowley Chapman and Barney, Ltd., has been serving the East Valley area for a long time. The firm was first founded in 1987 by attorney Richard Roberts, who retired in 2006, and they are celebrating their 30th anniversary this year.

Their objective is to be a full-service consumer law firm, and they’re known for their high ethical standards.

“We do a really good job of responding to all calls, and in a timely manner, too,” says Kenneth Barney. “We take a lot of pride in really taking care of our clients.”

They also strive to be a family-friendly place to work and try to recognize employees’ family needs. Because of this, there is longevity in the service of their employees, some of whom have been with the firm for 20 years.

Each partner and associate has his or her own personal area of expertise, which includes estate planning, personal injury, family law, litigation, and criminal defense.

The firm has created their own mission statement, by which they all try to live:

In order to accomplish our objective to improve the economic well being and quality of life of all stakeholders, we endorse and promote the following principles among ourselves and others.

  • All people have intrinsic value.
  • Honesty is the best policy.
  • We reap what we sow.
  • Resources are valuable.
  • We should treat others as we wish to be treated.
  • Take the time, do it right.
The law offices of Rowley Chapman and Barney, located in the First Fidelity building in Mesa, AZ. Photo courtesy of Rowley Chapman and Barney.

The law offices of Rowley Chapman and Barney, located in the First Fidelity building in Mesa, AZ. Photo courtesy of Rowley Chapman and Barney.

“This law firm, Rowley Chapman & Barney, exceeded our expectations. This firm is fair, honest and trustworthy,” says a recent client. “Nathaniel Wadsworth was such a pleasure to work with. He is knowledgeable, professional and was attentive to our case, as was the entire team. Throughout the entire process, the attorneys, paralegals and staff at this firm delivered quality and timely communication. Their legal services are also cost-effective and reasonably priced for the high quality attention you will receive. If you are looking for a trustworthy, honest group of dedicated lawyers to work diligently with you, this is the firm to hire!”

They are also an AV rated law firm, which is the highest rating a firm can receive from Martindale-Hubbell, a well-known law firm directory and information company for the legal profession.

Their offices are located at 63 East Main Street #501 in Mesa and can be reached by phone at 480-833-1113.  More information is available on their website at http://www.azlegal.com.

Story by Katherine Ogden, The Arizona Beehive

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GRACED WITH HER LOVE & PRESENCE – Sandi Nielson, Avondale Vice Mayor, Dies At 62 http://arizonabeehive.com/graced-with-her-love-presence-sandi-nielson-avondale-vice-mayor-dies-at-62/ http://arizonabeehive.com/graced-with-her-love-presence-sandi-nielson-avondale-vice-mayor-dies-at-62/#comments_reply Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:15:46 +0000 http://arizonabeehive.com/?p=6613 Sandi Nielson, who was elected to a four-year-term on the Avondale City Council and appointed Vice Mayor in January 2017, passed away on August 19 at 62. Photo courtesy Avondale City Council.

Sandi Nielson, who was elected to a four-year-term on the Avondale City Council and appointed Vice Mayor in January 2017, passed away on August 19 at 62. Photo courtesy Avondale City Council.

Simply put, Sandi Nielson touched lives.

So much so that when, on August 19, 62-year-old Sandra Margene Nielson lost her valiant battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Avondale Mayor Kenn Weise proclaimed August 28 “Sandi Nielson Memorial Day.”

A member of Coldwater Ward, Phoenix West Maricopa Stake, at the time of her death, Sandi was born March 13, 1955, to G. Larry and Betty Gibb. She grew up in an Air Force family, so lived in places across the United States and Canada. In 1975, she married Curtis Nielson in the Salt Lake Temple. They moved to Arizona the following year, and, after living in San Manuel and Tucson, relocated to Avondale in 2004.

Sandi was elected to a four-year term on the Avondale City Council in 2014, and in January 2017, the council appointed her Vice Mayor.

“Sandi Nielson embodied everything that was good, and selfless, and noble in public service,” Mayor Weise said. “Whether it was at her church, or on her homeowners’ association and school boards, Sandi was always there to volunteer her time and talents.”

Indeed, Sandi has made a difference, serving since as president of her homeowners’ association for more than a decade, on the governing board of two school districts, on the Board of Directors for the Southwest Valley Chamber, and as Chair of the Avondale Interfaith Council.

Working with youth, she taught 4H girls to sew, served as a Girl Scouts cookie coordinator, and for many years, supported Boy Scouts and oversaw Eagle Scout Projects, for which she was honored with the District Award of Merit, the council-level Silver Beaver Award, and a Lifetime Achievement Award.

Sandi was an avid reader and loved to travel, visiting every state in the United States and many countries, including Brazil, Israel and Turkey.

Most of all, she loved Curtis, her four children and 15 grandchildren—and loved knowing that her family could be eternal.

Sandi Nielson, pictured center, with the people she loved most of all: her husband, Curtis, and their children and their spouses, (top row, left to right), Nicholas and Serina Haines, Jace and Heidi Larkin, Jason and Carrie Nielson and Meggan and Peter Nielson, and their 15 grandhildren. Photo courtesy Heidi Larkin.

Sandi Nielson, pictured center, with the people she loved most of all: her husband, Curtis, and their children and their spouses, (top row, left to right), Nicholas and Serina Haines, Jace and Heidi Larkin, Jason and Carrie Nielson and Meggan and Peter Nielson, and their 15 grandhildren. Photo courtesy Heidi Larkin.

Sandi, who joined the Church when she was 17, posted her testimony on Mormon.org, saying, “Being a member of this church has answered so many of my questions, given me understanding about Jesus Christ’s atonement for each of us, where I came from, what I am to do here on earth, and how to return to my loving Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ.”

She added, “I love the doctrine of Families are Eternal.…My husband and I have been married in one of the Temples and our family is now sealed forever. I love my husband dearly. I cannot comprehend a heaven without him forever.”

Of her many Church callings, her favorite was serving in the Mesa and Phoenix Temples.

Sandi is survived by her parents, by Curtis, their children and spouses: Jason and Carrie Nielson, Heidi and Jace Larkin, Peter and Meggan Nielson, and Serina and Nicholas Haines. She is also survived by 15 grandchildren.

Avondale Councilman Lorenzo Sierra voiced the feelings of all who knew her when he wrote on Facebook, “Our world – my life – is better because it was graced with her love and presence.”

Anyone wishing to donate to ALS Foundation in Sandi’s name may visit http://webaz.alsa.org

Story by Cecily Markland Condie, The Arizona Beehive

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SERVING GOD BY SERVING STUDENTS – BYU Idaho’s Pathways Program Connects With Arizona State University http://arizonabeehive.com/serving-god-by-serving-students-byu-idahos-pathways-program-connects-with-arizona-state-university/ http://arizonabeehive.com/serving-god-by-serving-students-byu-idahos-pathways-program-connects-with-arizona-state-university/#comments_reply Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:15:46 +0000 http://arizonabeehive.com/?p=6611 Elder Henry B. Eyring, ASU President Michael Crow, and BYU Idaho President Paul Gilbert at BYU Idaho where President Crow Delivered the devotional address.

Elder Henry B. Eyring, ASU President Michael Crow, and BYU Idaho President Paul Gilbert at BYU Idaho where President Crow Delivered the devotional address.

In 2000, the largest private junior college in the United States, Ricks College, became Brigham Young University-Idaho. At the same time, it began operating year-round and offering online courses. The goal was simple: serve more students.

In May 2017, an historic collaboration was announced to continue that goal by formally connecting BYU-Idaho’s Pathways program with Arizona State University.
Arizona State University President Michael Crow traveled to Rexburg, Idaho, along with several leaders from Arizona, to launch the program with BYU-Idaho President Henry Eyring. With this program, transfer students who might not otherwise be able to graduate from ASU would be guaranteed admission after meeting credit and score requirements through the existing Pathways program.

To the uninitiated, the two universities have little in common. They do, however, share an urgent interest in programs that prepare students for meaningful lives and careers.
During the Rexburg visit, President Crow became the first non-Mormon ever to deliver a devotional address at BYU-Idaho. He focused his address on shared values between his institution and the Church, and left his audience with a challenge to “create an environment where the full potential of the individual human can be realized.”

Through collaboration, the Church and ASU will create an environment that is accessible to people of all beliefs and acknowledges that learning need not separate from a student’s religion.

President Crow delivering his address. Photo by BYU-Idaho

President Crow delivering his address. Photo by BYU-Idaho

This announcement is only one of several Church connections and opportunities new to Arizona in the last several years. There are now two Institutes of Religion at ASU – one in Tempe and one in Mesa – that keep high-achieving LDS undergraduates contributing on campus while enabling them to grow their faith. There is also a free immigration legal clinic in downtown Mesa, supported by the Church and staffed by graduate students and volunteers.
Retaining the best talent for the state has been a community affair. Thanks to two generous scholarships set aside for LDS students choosing ASU, the Pioneer Heritage Scholarship and the Beus Family New American University Scholarship, recipients can reach higher. Leo Beus, co-founder of the law firm Beus Gilbert, says he and his family feel blessed to support students with the scholarship that carries their name.

Michael Crow, Paul Gilbert, Leo Beus at BYU-I. Photo by BYU-Idaho.

Michael Crow, Paul Gilbert, Leo Beus at BYU-I. Photo by BYU-Idaho.

“For those living in the area, there is no longer a need to run somewhere else to meet others,” said Elder Neil L. Andersen at a Family Education Night on ASU’s campus last January, noting the five young adult stakes in the area. “Here you’re surrounded with hundreds of wonderful young people who have the same beliefs you do, along with a world-class university where you can learn and grow, have the diversity of students and professors, and a welcoming institution like we have here at ASU.”

The experience left a great impression on Brother Beus. He says of the Rexburg announcement, “As a resident of the Phoenix community and someone who cares deeply about the God-given potential of every young LDS person, I celebrate such opportunities, even when the connection may seem unlikely.”

We have the powerful opportunity to foster future leaders by serving our God, our neighbors, and our students.

Story by Allison Beckert, The Arizona Beehive

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A PLACE PREPARED – Mesa Arizona Temple To Close For Two-year Renovation http://arizonabeehive.com/a-place-prepared-mesa-arizona-temple-to-close-for-two-year-renovation/ http://arizonabeehive.com/a-place-prepared-mesa-arizona-temple-to-close-for-two-year-renovation/#comments_reply Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:15:46 +0000 http://arizonabeehive.com/?p=6572 The Mesa Arizona Temple Gardens Christmas Lights event, which was started as a gift to the community, welcomes thousands to grounds of the temple each year to celebrate the birth of the Savior. Photo by John Power

The Mesa Arizona Temple Gardens Christmas Lights event, which was started as a gift to the community, welcomes thousands to grounds of the temple each year to celebrate the birth of the Savior. Photo by John Power

Just six weeks before Arizona’s sixth temple was dedicated and opened for patrons in Tucson this August, the First Presidency of the Church announced that the Mesa Temple—the state’s oldest—would be closed for extensive renovations.

The 90-year-old Mesa Arizona Temple will close in May 2018 and reopen in 2020. While there is much speculation about what changes will be made, an official statement from the Church simply states that the temple will undergo “needed repairs and upgrades”

Kenneth McKay Smith, of the Grandview 1st Ward, Mesa Arizona Central Stake, called as president of the Mesa Arizona Temple earlier this year, along with his wife, Jody, as temple matron, will succeed President J Brent Hatch and Sister Renae G. Hatch, and will begin their service November 1. The Smiths, with Kent Layton as first counselor and wife Dottie Layton as assistant to the matron, and Mike Vance as second counselor with his wife, Debbie, as assistant to the matron, will serve until the temple is closed. At that time, the counselors and assistants to the matron, as well as all ordinance workers, will be released.

However, said President Smith, “We will remain as president and matron through the closure.”

He and Sister Smith don’t know many details about what they will be doing while the temple is closed.

“I’m not very good with a hammer,” he joked. He quickly added that, until the closure, he hopes to be busy with the work he does know and love.

He says his love for temple began when he was a young man and went through the temple for the first time before his mission. Living in Provo, Utah, before a temple was built there, he was drawn to the Salt Lake Temple and the after moving to Mesa in 1978, he felt that same love and desire to serve in the temple here.

He hopes many will feel the same desire to serve in the coming months.

“We hope there will be lots of people coming to the temple in the months prior to its closing,” said President Smith.

The coming closing marks the second such closure since the Mesa Temple was originally dedicated in 1927. From the earliest beginnings the temple drew the attention and dedication the thousands of Saints in the southwest. Even before the official, Church-wide announcement that a temple would be built in Arizona, Saints in the stakes in Arizona and in Juarez, Mexico, as well as the California branches and the missions in Mexico were participating in fundraising drives.

Following the 1927 dedication of the Mesa Arizona Temple, excursions of Latter-day Saints came to the temple from throughout the southern United States, Mexico, and Central and South America. Photo courtesy of theclio.com. Added by Marshall University Libraries User on 2015-07-13.

Following the 1927 dedication of the Mesa Arizona Temple, excursions of Latter-day Saints came to the temple from throughout the southern United States, Mexico, and Central and South America. Photo courtesy of theclio.com. Added by Marshall University Libraries User on 2015-07-13.

The 20-acre tract that was then the eastern edge of Mesa was selected as the temple site in 1920. In November 1921, the site was dedicated by President Heber J. Grant and, in April 1922, a groundbreaking ceremony was held.

The original construction that began in January 1923 was overseen an Executive Building Committee appointed by the First Presidency with Maricopa Stake President, James W. LeSueur as chairman of that committee. President Grant appointed Arthur Price, an architect from Salt Lake City, as superintendent of construction.

In The Ninth Temple: A Light in the Desert, a book written to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Temple’s dedication, Price was referred to as a “demanding taskmaster. He required that all of the materials used throughout the construction should be the best of its kind obtainable and that the construction be as nearly perfect as possible.”

It took 13 months to build the concrete foundation, pillars and roof. At completion on February 1, 1924, a report stated they were “the most carefully measured, scientifically constructed, perfectly organized masses of concrete and steel every constructed into a building.”

Following a public open house, weeklong dedicatory services were held on October 23 through October 29, 1927, with President Grant presiding and voicing the dedicatory prayer. Then called the Arizona Temple, it was the first temple outside of Utah in the continental United States.

Ninety 10- and 11-year-old girls (Bluebirds) from the Maricopa Arizona Stake visited the Arizona Temple shortly after its dedication in 1927.

Ninety 10- and 11-year-old girls (Bluebirds) from the Maricopa Arizona Stake visited the Arizona Temple shortly after its dedication in 1927.

David King Udall, who had formerly been the St. Johns Arizona Stake President, had served as Stake Patriarch for a short time before being called to be the first president of the Arizona Temple, with his wife, Eliza, as matron.

One of his counselors, Frank V. Anderson, is quoted in Arizona Pioneer Mormon as having said, “In the beginning …, in a work new to all of us, Brother Udall constantly admonished us to go slowly, build conservatively, but well. … [W]hile work at the Arizona Temple forged ahead of many older Temple districts, he was never heard to make any comparison.”

Still, the growth was remarkable, and President Udall “saw the ordinances of the House of the Lord at Mesa, Arizona, increase from 12,770 in 1927 to 152,998 in 1934. The Temple, originally intended for companies of but eighty persons, soon proved entirely inadequate, and as many as two hundred and fourteen persons have been incorporated into one company, crowding the edifice to and beyond capacity.”

Upon his release, President Udall said, “Having an abiding faith in the divinity of this work I am convinced that the seven years spent as President of the Arizona Temple were the most fruitful years of my life. With my fellow laborers we blessed the lives of hundreds of thousands of people, some of whom were living, but most of whom were in the spirit world waiting anxiously to receive these earthly ordinances so necessary for their salvation and exaltation in our Father’s Kingdom.”

To the north of the temple, between it and the Visitors’ Center, a symbolic reflection pond adds to the beauty and peacefulness of the grounds. Photo courtesy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints – Media Room

To the north of the temple, between it and the Visitors’ Center, a symbolic reflection pond adds to the beauty and peacefulness of the grounds. Photo courtesy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints – Media Room

The temple continued to bless the many Saints it served, including members from Mexico who made regular excursions to Mesa to attend the first temple to offer the ordinances in Spanish.

In 1974, the Mesa Temple was closed for more than a year for extensive renovations to adapt the interior for the film presentation of the endowment. In addition, a large annex on the south and new entryway were added. At that time, 48 years after the original construction, the temple served approximately 115,000 in Arizona alone as well as continuing to serve members in the southwestern United States, Mexico and Central and South America.

Again, the temple was opened for public tours and, on April 15 and 16, 1975, the Mesa Arizona Temple became the first to be rededicated. With President Spencer Kimball presiding, and with 4,600 in attendance in the temple and watching by closed circuit television in the Visitors’ Center and the nearby tri-stake center, the dedicatory services were repeated seven times over the course of the two days.

Beautiful gardens and stately palm trees greet guests on the southwest side of the Mesa Arizona Temple. Photo courtesy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints – Media Room

Beautiful gardens and stately palm trees greet guests on the southwest side of the Mesa Arizona Temple. Photo courtesy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints – Media Room

Recognizing that the Mesa Arizona Temple holds a spot in so many hearts and the family history of so many in Arizona and surrounding states, President Smith believes there is much to look forward to. As part of the ongoing history of the Mesa Arizona Temple, when the renovations are completed in 2020, members will participate in another rededication and youth in the temple district will likely participate in a Cultural Celebration.

Perhaps most exciting is the opportunity members will have to share the temple with friends and neighbors.

“We’re excited that it will be open again for the public. We are excited that many more people in our community will be able to see it,” says President Smith.

Story by Cecily Markland Condie

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TWINSPERATION – Mesa Twins “Exterminate” The Competition On Their Way To Stardom http://arizonabeehive.com/twinsperation-mesa-twins-exterminate-the-competition-on-their-way-to-stardom/ http://arizonabeehive.com/twinsperation-mesa-twins-exterminate-the-competition-on-their-way-to-stardom/#comments_reply Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:15:45 +0000 http://arizonabeehive.com/?p=6618 Jeffrey and Jason Linford don’t want to “bug” you, but they just might be the next big thing in music . . . and pest control.

They were recently featured the ABC reboot of The Gong Show, where the identical twin brothers—both musicians and pest control specialists—took to the stage for an exterminator-themed fiddle rendition of Britney Spears’ “Toxic.” The performance brought the judges to their feet and earned high scores. The result? Their pest control company, originally called Green Worx, officially became the Hollywood Bug Guys.

Jason Linford, one half of the twin musical act The Hollywood Bug Guys. Photo courtesy of the Linford twins.

Jason Linford, one half of the twin musical act The Hollywood Bug Guys. Photo courtesy of the Linford twins.

“Our tagline is, ‘Every time a house is sprayed, an artist is paid!’” the twins joke.

Door-to-door pest control sales turned into mini-concerts early in their career for the music-minded twins, who got their first break in 2010 with a festival gig in Sun City Grand. From there, the twins acknowledge that they “basically became the pied pipers of pest control.” Since then, they’ve moved on from retirement communities to audition for the likes of Simon Cowell.

Jeffrey and Jason Linford grew up in Mesa. The brothers hail from a musical family and have been performing since their Primary days. Both brothers served missions, Jason in Korea and Jeffrey in Romania, and graduated in 2008 from BYU. They began gaining acclaim as the “Twin Fiddlers,” performing at events in the Provo area. In true twin fashion, the Linfords proposed to their girlfriends together—with an original song, of course—in front of an audience of thousands. The happy couples enjoyed a double wedding in 2014, and now Jeffrey and Ashley, his wife, are the parents of a baby boy while Jason and Esther, his wife, have two children.

While their fiddling earned praise on The Gong Show, the twins play a multitude of instruments and sing. They rehearse in a building called the Practice Pad, an old music store the two bought and lived in for over two years.

Jeffrey Linford, also of The Hollywood Bug Guys. Photo courtesy of the Linford twins.

Jeffrey Linford, also of The Hollywood Bug Guys. Photo courtesy of the Linford twins.

They call the Pad their “viral venue” and recorded a YouTube show there—but that’s just the beginning.

“We would love to make more TV appearances as The Hollywood Bug Guys . . . like we did for The Gong Show. We also would love to make high quality music videos like our friend Lindsey Sterling, who we grew up with performing in the same orchestra program,” says Jeffrey.

There are plans for an album and a reality television show about the pest control performers in the works, and the Linfords are optimistic about their chances for success. They’ve attended the prestigious and well-connected Musicians Institute, and have received vocal coaching and artist development from top industry star markers.

“Now that we’ve been to Hollywood, we’ve come a long way from being a twin fiddle, boy band, ukulele-toting act.”

You can catch the Linfords on Facebook and Twitter @thehollywoodBG.

Story by Merry Gordon, The Arizona Beehive

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Missionaries October 2017 http://arizonabeehive.com/missionaries-october-2017/ http://arizonabeehive.com/missionaries-october-2017/#comments_reply Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:09:35 +0000 http://arizonabeehive.com/?p=6659 “For behold the field is white already to harvest; and lo, he that thrusteth in his sickle with his might, the same layeth up in store that he perisheth not, but bringeth salvation to his soul.” (D&C 4:4)

Meet some of our latest, local Elders and Sisters that have entered the mission field. Each of these Missionaries visited Duke & Brandt Photography and Digital Imaging for their Free Picture, ready for their Ward Plaque, and lifetime keepsake. Your missionary may do the same. Contact Duke & Brandt to set up your photo session.

Click on the images below for a full view experience!

 

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CALLED TO SERVE – A Mother’s Perspective On Preparing Her Missionary http://arizonabeehive.com/called-to-serve-a-mothers-perspective-on-preparing-her-missionary/ http://arizonabeehive.com/called-to-serve-a-mothers-perspective-on-preparing-her-missionary/#comments_reply Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:09:35 +0000 http://arizonabeehive.com/?p=6639 Ramirez Family

Ramirez Family

A son or daughter serving a full-time mission generates blessings for the entire family. For the Ramirez family, there was never a question about Matthew serving a mission. His mother, Myranda Ramirez of the Biltmore Ward in the Phoenix Arizona East Stake, recalls that “it was clear early in life that Matthew was born to serve a mission. He was always gospel focused and very much embraced his church activities.” Sister Ramirez further elaborates that “as the oldest in the family, Matthew felt the importance of setting an example for his family.”

Myranda grew up in an LDS home that was not always active. When she and her husband Rick learned she was pregnant with their first born, they vowed to be an active “Forever Family.” They remained active and provided a loving home for all of their children. However, even a gospel-oriented family suffers hardship and the Ramirez family suffered a brutal one when Rick unexpectedly passed away. With the passing of his father, Matthew’s role as the oldest son and brother suddenly became much wider in scope. “He became the man of the house. He has been our Priesthood holder and protector,” says Sister Ramirez. “The one thing I did not anticipate when Rick died was that for the first time as a family, we would not have the Priesthood in our home, and how much we depended on that close relationship. That was a sobering realization.”

Now more than ever, Matthew wished to serve as a missionary.

Two years after the passing of her husband, Sister Ramirez submitted Matthew’s mission papers. In six weeks the much anticipated “white envelop” arrived. Just prior to receiving it, each member of the family rushed home each day to check the mail after their Bishop, Russell Perkins, informed them that their letter was on its way!

When it was time for Matthew to open his mission call, the family set up a Facebook live session, and invited family and ward members over to the Ramirez home. “We were all so excited and happy,” recalls Sister Ramirez. “We had donuts, hot chocolate and plenty of love in our backyard that night. We sang I Hope They Call Me on A Mission, and Matthew’s favorite, Be Still My Soul.”

As Matthew finally opened his letter, Sister Ramirez thought about her son waking up early each day to practice piano, read his scriptures, and say his prayers, preparing to serve his mission well. “He just seemed born to serve. He wanted to start a new tradition of serving a mission in the family. He wants all the kids in the family to follow his lead.”

Where was Elder Ramirez called to serve our Heavenly King of Glory? Georgetown, Massachusetts! The entire Ramirez family, including Rick, is proud of their missionary son.

Elder Ramirez and Elder McCormick.

Elder Ramirez and Elder McCormick.

*How did you prepare your missionary? Share your story with us by sending us an email to grace@arizonabeehive.com or post it on our Facebook page (find us @BeehiveNews). We might contact you to print your story in The Arizona Beehive!

Story by Grace O’Brien, The Arizona Beehive

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PREP YOUR MISSIONARY – Making Sense Of Your Mission Packet http://arizonabeehive.com/prep-your-missionary-making-sense-of-your-mission-packet/ http://arizonabeehive.com/prep-your-missionary-making-sense-of-your-mission-packet/#comments_reply Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:09:35 +0000 http://arizonabeehive.com/?p=6623 Prep Your Missionary

Prep Your Missionary

While submitting your papers is tough, the documents in your mission packet detail work for you that is specific to your exciting new call. Here are a few tips for keeping ahead of the deadlines and staying on track.

First, make a copy of your mission packet. If you want your original packet for a keepsake, get a working copy of each page in the packet before putting the original away. As an initial step, go through the instructions and highlight every number, email, and mailing address. Find the deadline dates listed for any requested documents. Look for amounts, log-in codes/passwords, etc. This should draw your eye to the important information at a glance.

Physically organize what documents you have and what you still need. Bishop Bartley Beckert of the Greenfield Park Ward in Mesa draws on his time as an educator when advising missionaries to keep organized. He has them label separate folders for their major preparation needs – medical/shots, travel papers, packing and supplies, etc. At all times, have a running checklist with a place to record the deadline for each item and the date it’s completed. Keep everything together as much as possible to avoid being caught without something essential.

Remember to consider delays and processing time when scheduling appointments. Photo by Pixabay.

Remember to consider delays and processing time when scheduling appointments.
Photo by Pixabay.

Investigate each process before beginning. Some items on the list will have hidden delays you can anticipate if you just take a look before starting. Some shots, for example, have to be done in stages with waiting time between. There will be costs that should be considered before just plowing ahead. Official documents have to be paid for, with additional costs if they need to be expedited. Give some thought to whether your documents have to arrive by the deadline listed, or just have to be in the mail by that date, and adjust your lists accordingly.

Working through the mission packet effectively can mean dodging unfortunate, sometimes lengthy, delays. There are many things out of your power, but carefully reading and intelligently planning your post-call preparation are in your control.

Reading, understanding, and reviewing formal documents like your call are all life skills, ones that will come easier with help from your adult support system. Seek help, but don’t be surprised if they take a supporting role and expect you to do much of it yourself.

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